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dignitaries cut a piece of crime scene tape to officially open the new lab. >> forensic sciences will specialize particularly in dna testing, firearms and fingerprints and will have a fully functioning public health lab as well. >> reporter: gone are the days when evidence collected from rape victims sat on shelves untested and dna from cold cases went unanalyzed. >> it was a lot of work and i lot of advocacy. but can i tell you why i'm really here? i'm here for the moms of homicide victims who they labored so long and so hard to try to get this lab built and victims of sexual assault who were victimized twice when their rape kits weren't tested. >> reporter: kathy patterson help put the lab's initial pieces in place. first two floors of the building house the crime lab where firearms will be tested and fingerprints examined. the dna lab, which for the last two years occupied space in lorton, now has a permanent home. an entire floor will house the city's morgue where autopsies will be done. there is even a toxicology lab. >> to reduce this to what it is all about, it is more lik
it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think i
, and other research is a tuition for developing the next-generation of sciences in the biomedical spear and for generating new ideas in the bio tech industry and several others depend on. despite all of these good things, there has been little change in the budgets since the 5-year doubling of the budget. when the count in inflation, we are back in buying power. with the rapid growth of the medical community and increased expense of bioscience work, the success rate for grant applicants has fallen to an all- time low to about 14% of nci and 17% nih wide. that is an ironic comment at the time when the scientific opportunities are remarkably high in part because many prior investments -- and the result of deciphering the blueprint of living organisms through the human genome project. they analyze the chromosomes of many microorganisms. the ability to support and enlarging and scientific community, the by medical ecosystem is under unusual stress. there is more investment elsewhere in other countries and more stable environment for research. we are running the risk of losing leadership to
at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> governor brown visited the google headquarters to sign a bill that allows a global driverless cars one step closer to our roads. >>pam: a few other new laws signed today. a new plan for state parks in the wake of plant closures and the scandal. those stories and more coming up at 5:30 p.m.. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow. you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver. only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. >>dan: we are following breaking this tonight, reggie kumar is live on the scene in oakland where a pregnant woman was injured in a shooting. >>reggie: we're hearing reports that a pregnant wom
saying we ought to be reality-based and science-based. we need to go back to a science and reality-based approach to policymaking. and by the way, i sit on the armed services committee and who leads the fight on the climate change in a smart and 21st century way. it is the military because they know that energy security will benefit us. that there will be environmental benefits and that the job creation will help get our economy back. >> jennifer: they're defending our country to make us independent from foreign oil too. it is lives in our military. i gotta go. but senator i just so appreciate you joining me inside "the war room." you're thoughtful. you're a battler for the things that are important. hopefully we can get you more help after the election. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >>. >> jennifer: up next, the president has numerous foreign policy achievements that he can claim. but what about mitt romney's foreign policy credentials other than insulting the british at the olympics? and there's a ne
the early stock numbers. de me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. i like to score my designer shoes and handbags early. so i shop at t.j.'s. i get my favorite brands without having to wait for them to go on sale someplace else. done! fashion direct from designers. savings direct to you. t.j.maxx. to meet the needs of my growing business. but how am i going to fund it? and i have to find a way to manage my cash flow better. [ female announcer ] our wells fargo bankers are here to listen, offer guidance and provide you with options tailored to your business. we've loaned more money to small businesses than any other bank for ten years running. so come talk to us to see how we can help. wells fargo. together we
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
, but wt i've proposed moving forward, building off of the race to the top, let's hire new math and science teachers who are trained in math and science without being thrown i the classroom without the eparioey. focus on early childhood education. part of our race to the top is let's figure out what are the dropout factories out there. some schools are really underperforming. let' transform tho schools. and all tseitont we have to do is combine creativity and evidence-based approaches. so let's not use ideology. let's figure out what works and combine that with resources. and this is big argument and big difference that i'ot gnoomney in this election. they talk a good game about reform, but when you actually look at budgets, they're talking about slashing our investment education by 20, 25%. we've already seen 300,000 teachers that have been fired ross the country, and a a consequence class sizes have gone up by 5%. and when you talk with a teacher -- i was meeting wita couple of teachers in las vegas -- they said they've got 42 kids in a class, some of them sitting on floor. it takes a cou
science to that, as well, when i was governor. two, they worked on a statewide curriculum. it took a number of years, but they had a series of elements they felt students needed to learn. three, they would evaluate annually the success of various schools. all the schools actually. and if a school consistently fell below a passing grade, then the state had the capacity to step in, take over the school, remove its leadership, and actually remove elements of the union contract if they believed those elements interfered with the education of a child. beyond that, i had the chance not just to have this, if you will, the stick if you can't pass the graduation exam you can't graduate, i also worked to put in place a carrot, an incentive. while i was governor, we passed legislation that said that if you took the exam to graduate and you were among the top quarter in your high school in terms of the grade you got on that exam, then you were entitled to the john and an about a gail adams scholarship, which was four years tuition free at any massachusetts public institution of higher learning
of english, at least three years of mathematics, at least three years of science and at least three years of social science, comparedded to those who students who did not complete a core curriculum, those students completing a core curriculum scored 144 points higher on the s.a.t. >> suarez: what do we know about the predictive value of the test itself? you have a threshold for college readiness. if you go into an institution of higher learning without reaching that threshold, are you automatically going to fail, not complete? what do we know? >> absolutely not. that threshold is a guide. it allows us to look at groups of students. what we know is that the group of students who meet the threshold have a 65% likelihood of achieving a b-minus g.p.a. or higher during their freshman year. obviously there are other factors that admission officers take into consideration. but it does help guide us in thinking about where we are and the need to have more students better prepared for college. currently of 100 ninth graders, 44 will go on to college. yet only 21 will graduate within a six-year per
is a film called "looper," the science fiction film that just played toronto that i just got back from. it's a really wonderful film with joseph gordon-levitt and bruce willis. i really hope people take a chance on it, 'cause it's a lot of fun, a lot of great action, and a lot of great ideas, which we don't have in movies these days. > > i have to tell you, i am very much enjoying the movie trailer to "won't back down." > > it kind of looks like an oscar contender doesn't it? just the way it's got viola davis, maggie gyllenhaal- > > two good actresses. > > yeah, but, you know, fox is not, they didn't really put this movie in the film festivals, so they're just kind of quietly releasing it here at the end of september. it has the look and feel of an oscar contender, but i really don't hold a whole lot of hope out for it. > > so september just kind of a month ... > > something we can write off. there's going to be some better stuff next month we can talk about. > > we will see you next month. that's erik childress, he is vice-president of the chicago film critics' association, joins us every
, science and language arts and coached. the principal received word of the incident monday and informed the middle school and district headquarters. >> we made a report to the police department monday evening. subsequently, an investigation is ensuing. it is my understanding that the teacher was arrested. >> reporter: the man who had been teaching monday was arrested at his home yesterday morning. the alleged victim described as former student. he was very popular with students. >> arrested mr. i? what! >> reporter: some parents are in disbelief. >> i hope it is not true. my daughter adored him. he was a great teacher. i lived her all my life, i know him as a student myself. >> reporter: students are being offered counseling. the superintendent says izumizaki's record was clean and performance above average. >> we hire credentialled teachers thoroughly fingerprinted. we do reference checks. everything that we can do. >> reporter: mr. izumizaki is being held on $100,000 bail. he's scheduled to make his first court appears tomorrow afternoon. there's a meeting scheduled here in the librar
in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tenn
>>> today on mosaic we're going to talk about science. and i guess the canon lawyer with the archdiocese of san francisco will have to speak for himself. are you insane? >>> i'm working on its. >>> that is kind of the hope of the charge that will all work towards holiness. >>> the church has seats in which you think would be an opening good dialogue about sainthood canonization and what people it chosen to be saints what would be a good place to start? a >>> since i've been around long before there were canonized an officially recognized by the church we are are called to holiness that's the fundamental part of the christian life and the church missing a value in making these people recognized and bring them to the christian faith as models and place before recess people commit called upon for intercession. the zero aspects of sainthood that we will get into. >>> when we talk about canonization it is to be inscribed in the canons of the church. to be in the church for ever. >>> there's a book called the roman martyrology the official book that has all of the le
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
. >> there is science now we didn't have before. that sexual orientation is not something that can be changed. >> but the victory may be short lived and there are groups that already claim it's unconstitutional violating first amendment. >> this is absolutely clamps down on speech by professionals involved and also affects the minors and their parents rights to access types of therapies they may want. >> legal groups also argue conversion therapy does work for people. >> when this benefits people, and may or may not benefit other people there is no basis for the state to step in. >> this is among the darkest times of my life? >> did it work? >> no. i am just as gay as i ever was. >> other states will be interested in seeing how this case plays out. they, too are considering the ban autos there is a busy weekend ahead. there a look at options this weekend. >> and there is a killer whale in sea world with a injury what. trainers say could have caused this massive wound. >> and this is the rover seeing unusually have you heard of the new dialing procedure for the 408 and 669 area codes? no, what
get violently sick. >> new science shows you increase the size of the brain because you stimulate brain growth. when you do things like physical activity. you induce changes in your genes. >> reporter: these scans show the reward senters reacting to a chocolate milkshake. for some people the pleasure receptors turn off. for others it keeps reacting, wanting more. by focusing on the three ms. mind, mouth and muscle. the doctor thinks you can restrain the brain. tara is in what dr. peak calls master recovery. she did something beyond her wild dreams. finished an iron man triathlon. >> no dream is improblem. >> reporter: tara said she'll be a recovering food addict but knowing that is a victory. >> i wish i could be normal with it. but it will be okay. >> "the hunger fix " is in stors now. >>> up next the president's candid moments. secret recordings of john f. kennedy. plus "dancing's" biggest stars back. we talked with tom bergeron about dancing with the all stars. and retire with more? then don't get nickle and dimed by high cost investments and annoying account fees. at e-trade,
. live claritin clear. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ am i don't know. anyool? medications? and that's pretty cool. last immunization shots? really? honey, what's my blood pressure medicine called? one time i took something and i blew up like a puffer fish. i'm probably allergic to that. at kaiser permanente, your medical information is available to you and your doctors. quickly. securely. no guesswork required. better information. better care. kaiserpermanente. thrive. >>> fade in -- los angeles county, california. garrett warren was gunned down, shot four times in his own home, but somehow survived. it fit his character really. a hollywood stuntman, martial artist and former fighter. not only did he survive, but
viewed more than 4- 1/2 million times. in the video he says evolution is fundamental to all life science and parents should not encourage children to reject it. he produced this in response to efforts to present bible stories as a alternative to evolution in public schools. >>> a turn for a big rig accident. the driver lost control of a 18 wheeler filled with beer. it happened yesterday in downtown. the driver took the exit too fast that caused the rig to flip. it doesn't appear the driver was under the influence. >>> a condition called zombie bees has been discovered in washington. it causes bees to fly at night and lurch till they die. a bee keeper in washington found the first bees in that state. a biologist in san francisco discovered them in california in 2008. he uses a website to track it across the country. >>> mayor ed lee alawed the commission on -- applauded the commission on domestic violence. mayor ed lee said the commission helped cut domestic violence homicides by 80% and he promised to improve those numbers even more. >> to keep that work up. to keep the issues in front o
is painfully low on the list of science or engineers or technology and what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low. what should be down about it? >> i think it is priorities and greed. at the end of the day it is greed and lack of leadership to the point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money on prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in mercury don't get it. >> general? >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. one of the problems that we have is we are an older manufacturing economy. we are used to paper orders and other things if you go to china and you look at a network like alibaba. we can move more into the internet age in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as? >> i think that we live in a diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something that is great. but america is excelling in something as well. with china it could burst ladders of opportunity. many people are stuck in
, african-american, latino, islanders specifically were not given those classes, integrated science or integrated math which could get you to graduation, but could never get you to college. that a through g graduation requirement gave them access, so, that's one fabulous thing about this graduation requirement. the other thing is it gives them opportunity. quite frankly, d or better gives them no opportunity. a d or better says will not get them into college. a d or better. and quite frankly it's even cs and d at some colleges. so, d or better is actually not an adequate, i think, level to say that we have graduated with all fairness, have graduated our students prepared to college or a job because d or better is not prepared for college or a job. so, as a board i think if we're going to be looking at this graduation requirement should it be c or better or d or better. we're giving the numbers for both to see how much work we have to do. i think you can see on the chart even with the d or better we have much, much more work to do. this talks with black migration, african-american mi
% registered democrats. but only 14% are republican. social science is only 6%. >> 70 2% self identify as liberal. which is a big disparity between them and the general public. john: you were a junior when obama was elected? >> it was light a little of the colt it happened across the nation. john: not just the attitude but there are actual space -- speech restriction red light, yellow light and this university was demoted? >> to policies unc maintains which is sexual-harassment if you attended college and other than unc it bans all sexually explicit jokes. john: david, you have a copy what did you find? >> sexually explicit jokes jokes, books, it is different -- difficult to control how you look at someone. policy in the residence halls to avoid using the returners spoken word in the way that offends. that is a rage asleep fraud. a picture of mitt romney would offend 70%. [laughter] john: you may not explicitly or implicitly asked for sex. john: then how do you get there? [laughter] is it automatically rate? >> these policies are not well thought out. this is what you get to with burea
best educated and best trained workers in the world. that is why we trained 1000 more mass and science teachers. -- that is why we insisted on 100,000 more math and science teachers. we need that. we want to recruit these folks fifth as community colleges, we know we can create 2 million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing jobs of the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. in the next four years. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. ladies and gentlemen,there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask fifth very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million fifth we are going to c
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
, what steams me about the stack market science, is the false sense of security. as we got through the difficult month of september and now we are fine. that is really helpful. until it turns bad, here is the bottom line, the problem with these patterns is that they help until they don't. they give you comfort until there is no reason for it. my advice, ignore the calendar, do the homehomework. a broken stock clock, write twice a day. bill, here is bill. >> cramer from ohio the football hall-of-fame. >> number two belongs but he never made a super bowl so go ahead. >> talking about mpc a company that is poised to take advantage of opportunity crews. >> what do you think? >> i agree. i think it is a terrific situation. they he don't understand about the balkin and the eagle firm. and mpc is a winner in that situation and not a loser. let's go to robyn in california. >> hi, jim. booyah i read that arising christmas shopping is expected this year. mattel or other kid oriented stocks, whether they rise during the holiday season and ba what you think they will do this year. >> the toy c
the change for winter 2012. >> it's kind of a science. >> jummy the -- you meet the man behind "wicked" and how they turn the stage into >> discussion impossible tax hike under way and the impact could have on middle-class families. a man dies in police custody and is now being rolled homicide. allegations of illegal gambling and internet cafes. details on the claims being made by the maryl >> the weather channel will begin naming not or the winter storms this upcoming winter season to better communicate the threat and timing of a significant storms' impact. instead of calling things snow- tober or snopocalypse. the list includes athena, brutus, draco, and magnus. >> the most important things to look out will be accumulation and the combination of wind which can produce significant impact on the public. listen differentiate -- this will differentiate the system they will be using. tom tasselmyer? >> "bob's on teh way." we start talking about snowstorms three weeks in advance. >> brutus is coming! >> e tu? [laughter] >> pretty soon we will be naming rain storms. i don't know. >> we will
-changing high-tech world. >> the science has grown dramatically in the last 20 years. and it will be a gradual transition. but i think it's the way yes we have to do. it is the way of the future. and with the science advancing as rapidly as it is, i think it makes good sense. >> reporter: lanier praises the current officers who will get other uniform duties. the new $220 million headquarters of the city's chief medical examiner and state-of-the-art laboratories for crime scene analysis. it's due to open on monday and expected to improve police and prosecution work on thousands of cases. the chief medical officer responsible for all death investigations also will move from its rundown headquarters near the old d.c. general hospital to the new facility that will be run by a civilian director. but the d.c. fraternal order of police union says the city is making a mistake replacing seasoned sworn officers who know crime scenes. >> unless you're going to replace the experts, and that's what those guys are, experts, with experts, then that's potentially a problem. >> reporter: the union contends the
robotic claw. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. sleep train's inveis ending soon. sale save 10%, 20%, even 35% on a huge selection of simmons and sealy clearance mattresses. get 2 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. even get free delivery! sleep train stacks the savings high to keep the prices low. but hurry, the inventory clearance sale is ending soon. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ 7:16 a.m. and take a look at the weather elsewhere. there's a twist so yesterday. it rips through a small town that was outside of st. louis. it brought strong winds that were strong enough to blo
of georgetown's institute for law, science and global security. and i apologize if i butchered your last names. we will correct that in the feeds. >> it's great to be with all of you this morning i want to issue an apology if any of you are a twitter follower of mine. i have about 11,000 of them, and i guess yesterday they all got a little telling them that it just seemed and in this fantastic video. if you just clicked right your they could see it. at i think there is of a thousand friends, cycling through, this is the first time, it's ironic that i've ever fallen for one of the sort of cyber gags. i don't know what information they got from the, but nonetheless i wanted to kind of mentioned it and out myself as someone who is falling prey to the very folks out in cyber land. we have with us as mentioned katherine as executive director of georgetown institute for law, science and global security. she directs the global, george and cybersecurity project, and she also interestingly in the past, work with someone i'm well acquainted with, brent scowcroft from 2002-2006 as counsel to the presiden
events in american history? >> and down the hall in the science classroom, the normally giggle-indeu giggle-inducing topic of human reproduction turns into a lesson of self control. >> even though there might be some funny stuff here, you know, being able to control the laughing and bringing it back is just as important as any other skill you might ever have in your life. >> self control which is often in really short supply in our society has been proven to be a marker for success later in life. psychologists famously proved that years ago in the hidden camera marshmallow test, one of which is shown here. kids are offered the temptation, the instant gratification of a marshmallow while they're promised seconds if they can just hold off from ringing the bell. >> if you can stay here and wait for me to come back without eating the marshmallow, then you get two marshmallows. >> the kids who were able to marshal their marshmallow self-control and hold out for seconds, would later score about 200 points higher on their s.a.t.s than the kids who gave in. it might just be a marshmall
information that i am reporting on. i mean it's 400 pages of science, new discoveries of -- that should be changing the way we think about women and arousal and helping us understand that men's and women's sexual responses are not the same. just conventional wisdom that we are talk in from 40 years ago there is this amazing new neuroscience that shows there is a brain gentleman va gina vagina connection that people may be upset about not my leaders they are thrilled to learn more about themselves. the data explains why 30% of women report low sexual desire and another 30% some of the same well, some different, say that they don't reach orgasm when they want to. even in a hyper sexual icedized society. this is t*s not working for not working for women but this explains why. >> gavin: you are working around the mind vagina connection about, how is that controversial? it connects -- >> it's so funny, i wrote a book called misconceptions about the birthing industry which documented to understand of data on the brai
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
is great. americans are 14th in reading, 17th in science, 25th in math, among 34 countries at the top. this summit's focus is on solutions, one of the big topics today. how the curriculum in our schools is about to change in a big way. our chief education correspondent, rehema ellis is at the new york public library tonight. good evening, rehema. >> reporter: good evening, brian, the numbers you just mentioned tell a clear story, which is why the nation's governors adopted the common core curriculum. this new, tougher more demanding standard of learning is generating buzz at the summit, as teachers are gearing up to teach a new way. at this elementary school in louisville, all 361 students are encouraged to think big. >> every day at jba is one day closer to? >> college. >> college. >> reporter: ranking near the bottom on standardized tests, kentucky was quick to incorporate the tests, a blueprint for english and math, adopted by every state. while there is no common curriculum, this raises academic standards nationwide. and for the first time, an a will mean the same thing for studen
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
nobody is behind the wheel. >> today we are looking at science fiction becoming reality. >> the fine the notion, and governor jerry brown arrived at google in a self driving a car to accelerate california's leadership in autonomous vehicles. google has already logged 300,000 mi. with this technology. a new law allows them on public roads for testing as long as a licensed and insured drivers behind the wheel. the governor signed legislation in front of an audience of google employees. a google co-founder was asked when the public might get their hands on it >> we have some pretty ambitious targets for the team, they are stressed out looking at me answer this question >> he did say five years or less into believes it will save lives. 99 percent of all traffics in fatal accidents are caused by human error >> i suspect it will be far safer than human driven cars >> it also opens up the possibility of the blind people driving. cutting down on congestion, these cars automatically align themselves with precision and allow people to do something else while driving. who gets the ticket in a s
growth and in our history. the next is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two ears in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to
may sound like science fiction but google headquarters where engineers are working to make the dream a reality. explains a new and modernized of the road. >> perhaps the drive point governor jerry brown arrived today at google headquarters toyota. he then went inside and signed a law clearing the way for driverless cars to hit the road. >> self driving car is another step forward in this long march of california pioneering the future and leading not just the country, the whole world. >> the new law will set standards including requiring a human being to be behind the wheel in case of an emergency, but that may eventually change according to google cofounder. >> you can have a car drop you off at work, get out, walk through a little bit of space, and it goes off and takes somebody else somewhere else. >> he says driverless cars may enable large car sharing and potentially reduce the demand for parking. engineers say driverless cars will not be subject to what most automobile crashes, human error. >> i expect going to be far safer than human-driven cars. >> judging by a reaction, some
. >>> of today we are looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. in a self driving car to accelerate california's leadership in the vehicles. google has already launched 300,000 mi. of the technology. and new law allows the of and it allows them to sign legislation in front of an audience of googled employees. the co-founder was asked when the public might get their hands on this vehicle? he said we have some pretty ambitious targets you can see them being stressed and answer this question. >>> but he did say five years are less and he believes it will save lives. 90% of fatal accidents are caused by human error. >>> i expect that self driving cars are going to be safer. with its cameras in scanning laser it also opens up the possibility of blind driving cutting down on congestion as self driving cars automatically align themselves and allowing people to do something else while technically driving. which brings up the question who is the ticket itself driving a car is off parking itself and no one is inside but it runs a red lights. will work that out. this may be the easiest prob
. the appraiser was here. meet tom, an appraiser for 26 years. he said it's part art, part science. >> what kind of improve manies have you made to your home in the recent past? >> a lot. >> reporter: he spent about an hour looking them over and sizing them up. but could those simple changes really increase their appraisal? >> cost is not value. because you paid "x" number of dollars and put $200,000 of upgrades into your home does not mean the market will reimburse you for those expenses. >> reporter: a day later they were ready to find out if the market would reimburse them for their upgrade. remember the last appraisal was $190,000. the new appraisal? >> that's good. >> reporter: $214,000. a $24,000 increase. for "nightline" i'm share win alfonsi in hackettestown, new jersey. >>> that worked. thanks for sharyn. next up. single, mormon and looking for lasting love while the cameras roll. meet the contestants of the mormon bachelor. that's next. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion
. >> translator: i'm confident in the results and that the creation of a new element is a big step for science. >> there are 94 elements that exist naturally. 20 others have been created by scientists. >>> after months of wrangling deployment of a fleet of u.s. aircraft is about to take place. defense ministry officials say that 12 osprey will be deployed to the u.s. marine corps in okinawa prefecture as early as friday. ahead the deployment, officials from local municipalities were offered a test ride on the aircraft to ease their concerns. but few have accepted the offer. the test ride will take place on thursday at the air station in yamaguchi prefecture. the fleet of 12 osprey is currently undergoing atmosphere tests at the base ahead of deployment. but 19 of the 22 invited municipalities told nhk they have rejected the offer. the officials say they have other commitments. in the city where the aircraft will be deployed officials have declined the offer. they say they don't want to give the impression that they now think the aircraft is safe. officials from three municipalities say they w
is a big step for science. >> there are 94 elements that exist naturally. 20 others have been created by scientists. now the world weather forecast. you have been keeping a close eye on a typhoon east of the philippines. people there are dealing with torrential rain. now the storm is headed for taiwan. what can you tell us? >> the typhoon is now headed for tie yan and also the southern islands of japan. right now a violent and large typhoon definitely the strongest category typhoon. sustained winds are 200 kilometers per hour with gusts over 270. it looks like it will get close to taiwan or the sakashima islands by saturday morning local time. stormier conditions are in the cards. gusts are likely in the islands on friday. that will get even b faster on saturday. so things will become critical over the next few days here. after that, the system will veer to the northeast. so it will move through the okinawa or other islands of japan for the next couple of -- few days. so things will become severe here. in terms of rainfall we anticipate as much as 100 to 250 millimeters of rain in eas
, listed as athletic director taught math, science and language arts. the superintendent said she learned of the allegations monday, placed him on lee and called police. she says school -- police him on leave and call police. she says the school will reach out to parents, counseling available to students. e-mail sent to parents yesterday afternoon telling them about the situation and how a substitute will be coming in. next week the students will be distributed among regular teachers. expected to be in court on friday afternoon. there are dozens and dozens of people stepping forward saying in has to be a misunderstanding, there is no possible way that this man who they knew could possibly have done this. terry mcsweeney, abc7 news. >>> 4:33. more developing news, san francisco police moved in overnight and cleared out a camp on market street, closed streets took down tents and cited 40 people. amy hollyfield joins us from the federal reserve building. are police still out there? >> reporter: there are still officers out here. in fact, we've seen them on several corners. they are watching
francisco college student majoring in political science. i am the youth commissioner for district 10 appointed by supervisor malea cohen. i spent time in group homes and two consecutive years in juvenile hall. since then i've come a long way and thankful for being part of the youth commission in addition to working with the juvenile department. we heard from the youth and what they expect from the m-o-u. we share similar concerns to how you'ring out feel. we believe that including youth in the selection and valuation of the sro [speaker not understood] between our youth and officers. we, too, believe that adequate training for our police on how to deal with the city's young people will ensure safety between the police and our youth. in our historical joint hearing between the police and the youth commission on march 7th of this year we had three simple recommendations that were agreed to by the chief. one of which included an updated m-o-u and i have three here for you so you guys can see. one of which included an updated m-o-u in addition to a widespread pamphlet and training for of
visit the sciences for free. it's through the end of october. people living in certain zip codes, there they are on your screen, they can enter for free this weekend. all you have to do is enter a photo id. time now is coming up on our 5:00 hour. bay area police searching for a mother on the run. how she allegedly used her daughter to commit crimes and how the child was then literally left holding the bag. >>> also san francisco police in riot gear, we're taking you live out there this morning as they clash with protesters. officers are still on scene. what is our weather like for friday. >> depends on where you are. if you're inland on the coast, it's different. you can't get much cooler by the coast. anywhere from 60s to 70s. westbound 24, this traffic here looks good as you drive to the tunnel. no problems reported here between walnut creek and oakland. the san mateo bridge looks good over to peninsula. now to 5:00, let's go back to dave and pam. >> thank you. >>> happening right now, san francisco police are standing guard over a downtown occupy camp. ktvu is live
science. but in the end, broke my grand mother's heart was her 2 daughters could not come for their brother's funeral. when it explained to her that my aunts who lived in india and pack tan were considered enemy aliens we looked at us as we were inmates. we are brothers and sisters all of them are my children and went to grieve in the privacy of her prayers. we were quiet for sometime, both of us try to break away from the sounds of bombs and the sounds of grieve that accompany the tearing apart of people. 1 from the other. amy broke our silence. what do you mean pieces of your doll. i had 3 dolls all 3 were shanty. all 3 dolls were made of brittle plastic like material we called cutcha caw. they were hollow the different parts of their bodies were hooked with rubber bands. whatever held those 3 parts together they always broke within a few weeks and the dolls continued to exist in their separate components. i suspect my male cousin was the deconductor of the dolls. the grownups promised to reconstruct them but didn't have the time to follow up on their promises or forgot
to begin a new and here there are no science the deaths are not as severe the pure ifkification not complete. to let the natural of the sun have it's way with me. to feel the tips of grass force through the ashes of earth the complicated earth that seechls soft at the surface and yet so deep. that is how i feel the hidden layers of hardness, liquid and flame. can anything survive at the core. must i always hold people at a distance never let them settle inside me. mother there is not enough room for me in your womb. that's why i left. to seek a home a place where i could grow. 165 miles i crieds, 165 times i missed you today. 165 meals that did not satisfy. 165 was not the number of my dorm room. 165 dollars for a 1 way ticket. 651 the area code home. >> this is a record. phone rings, a set in mother tone asks, what are you eating, how are you getting around? warns me to lock all the locks on the door. my voice plays over and over half truths with fragmented vietnamese. i don't tell her that the locks have already been locked the click, click change of chain to groove. i don't
? >> sam? >> it's a cumulus cloud. >> you have to try the science department. >>> this controversial headline, talking about a mom gene. there's some new research that says that could be something that actually gets that some women are better suited to give birth and be mothers. >> i have mom jeans. >> i'm wearing them now. cue the music. >>> get ready, everybody. trash to treasure in the house. it was a staple on "gaa." welcome to "gma" with this anchor showdown, like we've never done before. going to show you how to transform flea market bargains into stunning showpieces, we hope. yeah. we'll do our best, lara. >> that would be good of you. >> you might understand -- >> i'm lowering expectations, as the presidential nominees are both doing. >>> now, to the shocking murder mystery out of hollywood, that ended up with an up-and-coming tv actor dead. johnny lewis and officials say he went on a violent rampage, allegedly killing his landlady and then himself. was a designer drug behind all of it? abc's david wright has the latest from los angeles. david? >> reporter: that's the working
artistic needs. we are lucky to have golden gate park. the museum and the academy of sciences and so many other institutions. but also, a lot of community arts centers. there is all these community arts space is that i just love, and it makes our neighborhoods a much more colorful and livable as well. >> what motivated your interest in politics? >> i guess i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign proces
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
in the science laboratory lab, two girls are discussing their project. >> you don't even know what you are doing the -- doing. you're dumb. >> you test too much. >> the day has come. the projects are to be returned. >> see, i told you? mine was the best. i told you, dummy. besides, let me see what you guys have. >> you know, i'm leaving. after school, alice and delores park thinking about human behavior. >> i don't know what people want to -- from me, for real. i have to say i think people just want me to be perfect. but you know what? i am capable of doing anything. it doesn't matter who i am or the way i look. what matters is the effort. i will study more. >> alice studied hard. she gets automatic a's. she's on the honor roll! -- she gets all a's. she's on the honor roll. >> oh, my god. i can't believe it? you see? i am capeable. don't call me dummy. now who do you think schnur i am a girl with just good grades. >> the morale of this story is that no matter what people think about you, all you have to do is show who you really are. even if the situation isn't good for you, you must make the be
of the things we talked about is having their staffing, which talked-about having science. encouraging people to go across the street if they are smoking in large numbers. they have agreed to that. i do not know of that -- if that is conditionable. we are -- to promote that with customers. that we do not have a big smoke cloud. >> it is a big parking lot. so that is perfect. >> is not enforceable but the smoking code says you have to go to the end of the curb. there is no way we can force them to do otherwise. sometimes being a good neighbor and encouraging patrons, there will be compliant. other than that, we're happy with the move. >> any questions for officer mathias? let's hear from the public. are there people from the public who would like to address this permit? your welcome. >> here is a song for the new gold dust. i wrote the song. >> did anyone tell you if you look like stacey slaughter who works for the giants? >> she does. >> you have a twin out there. >> here we go. ♪ in san francisco's fight to save the historic bar ♪ ♪ it was the 23rd of may but we are packing up the piec
their children educated. they want to get our edge back in science, and they want a policy headed by the president that helps close this gap that's widening between the united states and europe and japan. the american people want to keep opening doors. they want those civil rights laws enforced. they want the equal rights amendment ratified. they want equal pay for comparable effort for women. and they want it because they've understood from the beginning that when we open doors, we're all stronger, just as we were at the olympics. i think as you make the case, the american people will increasingly come to our cause. itmr. mondale, isn't possible that the american people have heard your message -- and they are listening -- but they are rejecting it? >> well, tonight we had the first debate over the deficit. the president says it'll disappear automatically. i've said it's going to take some work. i think the american people will draw their own conclusions. secondly, i've said that i will not support the cuts in social security and medicare and the rest that the president has propos
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
involved? >>> i was really interested in science and math as a student myself a long time ago my guidance counselors pushed me and soy started engineering and majored in that the spent my career in the engineering field. >>> but you have friends concept should engineering >>> i went to vanderbilt university as where i got my degree. the move up to a bay area to work for a biotechnology company. i spent over 20 years >>> vanderbilt is a great school. i was thinking about my high-school counselor who said i should be a secretary and so things have changed a little bit i'm glad to hear that. had to get the idea for black girls code. >>> my moment was when two different motivators when one was personal and one was professional had been in corporate america for a long time, do something different and being in the bay area of course i want to jump into this blossoming technology community. a certain network in go to events. and i did not releasing it too well with me of why that was the case. and on the personal side i have a daughter and is 13 now to 12 the time which is always on the computer
. and the biggest singles market, not the debt fuel consumption. driven by the advances in science and research. and a clean, green economy, with the low carbon technologies, leading the world. [applause] i have to tell you, in the last half, the most short-sighted of arguments, that we have to choose between going green. this is not just the right thing to do, this is a fantastic opportunity. the economy in britain is going strong we're right now. to create thousands of jobs, and the technology that will power a economies in the decades to come. going green, means going for growth. more energy that we produce ourselves, as a planet that we can proudly and over to our children. and going green means -- but the conservatives know there is no doubt that we will hold on to their promises on the environment. [applause] of course, there was a time when it looked like they got it. it seems like a long time ago, and there is the naturalist face. the windmills are gently turning, the sun is shining, and the exercise is quite brilliant. partyen at last year's conference they ruined it all, that you can
, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset to
. we know from the science that chemicals are ending up where they are not supposed to be and that is inside of our bodies. scientists can measure the chemicals getting into us, bio measuring. this is from the first chapter, indecent exposure, the intimate details. charlotte was surprised by the test results. mother of 2 among the first people to be tested for a wide range of industrial chemicals. test revealed that her body contained mercury lead cosmetics. i felt violated charlotte reported. she was upset about the pesticide. i never used them in my house, never on my lawn. i bought organic whenever i could. her body contained several variations of organic chlorines designed to attack nervous systems of insects. i never bought it. isn't that trespassing. i tell this in my story of mary broon. mary never felt called to be an environmentalist she was nursing her 6 month daughter olivia and a story had been done by texas tech where they looked at breast milk samples, all were contaminated with rocket fuel. i was stunned, i thought breast milk was as pure as it came fo
degree is in medical technology. my family always wanted a doctor, and so i headed toward the sciences. and going to medical school was something that i knew would be beneficial to the "race," world race, my race. but my thinking was, "i don't want to be a doctor who paints. i think i want to be a painter." it was like i was already an artist, but i mean, i just, i sort of had to say that to myself. my first interest is in the structure of something. and so when i start out making something, i'm not thinking about who might have lived there. i'm thinking about how i want it to look. structure for me is number one. and then i will decide who might have lived there. somes i will move away frowhat i'm working on and look at it -- look back at it -- and move around it and look at it. it's a process of getting a fresh look at something. it's like working on a drawing and you back up to see what your perspective is. and you see how you're doing -- how if it's flowing the way you want it flow, if it's moving the way you want it to move. i bent the metal one way, and i saw that the top part wa
the arms come apart. >> reporter: watch her hands. >> yep. baby just flies out. >> reporter: the science of destruction. a picture perfect crash, a wrecked jetliner and a treasure trove of new information about what it takes to survive the unthinkable. i'm neal corps skarlinsky for "nightline" in detroit. >> "curiosity: plane crash" airs sunday on the discovery channel. >>> she's known for her love songs like "you belong with me," come backstage with us at "glamour" cover shoot with the one and only taylor swift. [ female announcer ] e-trade was founded on the simple belief that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. because it helps you keep doing what you love. no wonder it's a
some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at the california academy of sciences, there is a very large collection of preserved and live specimens, which are the evidence about evolution. we have the assassin spiders, which are spiders that exclusively kill and eat other spiders. they are under the microscope here. research done and the california academy's i rhinology lab suggests that the assassin spiders have been doing this for over 150 million years. this glassed in room is a real scientific laboratory, and the people in that room are preparing specimens of vertebrate, that is mammals and birds. the way they do this is to remove the skin, sew it together in a relatively lifelike pose, and ensure that it does not decompose. >> i am a really big class actress fan, so i am here to see them, and beer week. >> i wanted to learn something and have fun. >> i always enjoy it. i am not all is well -- always working as i am tonight. sometimes i come to enjoy the music and to dance. ♪ >> culturewire covers the arts in san francisco, and one of my favorite culture artists is here tonig
-based international academy of television, art, and sciences oversees the awards. its members include about 500 media and entertainment companies. >>> for an update on the weather forecast, here's mai shoji. mai? >>> indeed, it is the typhoon season, but one after another we have storms coming in. we have a couple of storms to talk about. let's start off with this one. this is the tropical storm maliksi. it is moving towards the islands. throughout the day tomorrow, the islands will be affected due to this storm and it will be intensifying into a secure tropical storm status by wednesday evening. from the afternoon, actually, it will be around this region, so it will be quickly moving away. maliksi is a fast-moving system. it will be picking up its pace tomorrow. but the ting that this will be doing is it will be enhancing the stationary boundary, which is just south of the eastern coast of the toho ka region. due to that earn jized stationary front, thunderstorms will be affecting the eastern region especially and some heavy down tour pours to be looking out for. another storm is the kami over the s
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
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